DOCUMENTS

bibliography

Impact of Frailty on Hospital Outcomes Among Patients with Lymphoid Malignancies Receiving Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the United States

Published: June 7, 2022
Category: Bibliography
Authors: A Cristian, A Saxena, E Veledar, M Rubens, M Ruiz, P McGranaghan, R Tonse, V Ramamoorthy
Country: USA
Language: English
Type: Outcomes
Setting: Hospital

Abstract

Background

Frailty could affect outcomes of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT). This study sought to examine the effects of frailty on hospital outcomes among patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and multiple myeloma (MM) who received aHSCT.

Materials and Methods

This study was a retrospective analysis of Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, 2005 to 2014. Outcome variables were in-hospital mortality, prolonged length of stay and hospitalization cost. Frail patients were defined using the Johns Hopkins Adjusted Clinical Groups frailty-defining diagnosis indicator.

Results

There were 20,573 NHL, 8,974 HL, and 40,750 MM patients. Among them, 5.5% NHL, 3.8% HL, and 4.8% MM patients were frail. Among patients with NHL, there were significant associations between frailty and in-hospital mortality (Odds Ratio [OR], 4.04, 95% CI: 2.11-7.76), and prolonged length of stay (OR, 2.32, 95% CI: 1.56-3.46). Similarly, among HL, there were significant associations between frailty and in-hospital mortality (OR, 1.82, 95% CI: 1.43-2.76), and prolonged length of stay (OR, 1.55, 95% CI: 1.34-2.84). Likewise, for MM, there were significant associations between frailty and in-hospital mortality (OR, 4.28, 95% CI: 2.16-8.48), and prolonged length of stay (OR, 3.00, 95% CI: 2.00-4.51). These associations remained significant after stratifying by age and comorbidities. Significant differences were observed in hospitalization cost between frail and non-frail patients.

Conclusion

Among patients with lymphoid malignancies undergoing HSCT, frailty was associated with greater in-hospital mortality, longer length of stay, and higher hospitalization costs. Comprehensive health status assessments for identifying and managing frail patients in this population could improve patient outcomes.

comorbidities,frailty,hospitalization,outcomes

Please log in/register to access.

Log in/Register

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System.
All rights reserved. Terms of Use Privacy Statement

Back to top