DOCUMENTS

papers

Patient ability and willingness to participate in a web-based intervention to improve hypertension control.

Published: January 20, 2011
Category: Papers
Authors: Anderson ML, Catz S, Cook AJ, Fishman PA, Green BB, Ralston JD
Country: United States
Language: null
Type: Population Health
Setting: Hospital

J Med Internet Res 13:e1.

Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA

BACKGROUND: Patient-shared electronic health records provide opportunities for care outside of office visits. However, those who might benefit may be unable to or choose not to use these resources, while others might not need them.

OBJECTIVE: Electronic Communications and Home Blood Pressure Monitoring (e-BP) was a randomized trial that demonstrated that Web-based pharmacist care led to improved blood pressure (BP) control. During recruitment we attempted to contact all patients with hypertension from 10 clinics to determine whether they were eligible and willing to participate. We wanted to know whether particular subgroups, particularly those from vulnerable populations, were less willing to participate or unable to because they lacked computer access.

METHODS: From 2005 to 2006, we sent invitation letters to and attempted to recruit 9298 patients with hypertension. Eligibility to participate in the trial included access to a computer and the Internet, an email address, and uncontrolled BP (BP ≥ 140/90 mmHg). Generalized linear models within a modified Poisson regression framework were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of ineligibility due to lack of computer access and of having uncontrolled BP.

RESULTS: We were able to contact 95.1% (8840/9298) of patients. Those refusing participation (3032/8840, 34.3%) were significantly more likely (P .05) to be female, be nonwhite, have lower levels of education, and have Medicaid insurance. Among patients who answered survey questions, 22.8%(1673/7354) did not have computer access. Older age, minority race, and lower levels of education were risk factors for lack of computer access, with education as the strongest predictor (RR 2.63, 95% CI 2.30-3.01 for those with a high school degree compared to a college education). Among hypertensive patients with computer access who were willing to participate, African American race (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06-1.40), male sex (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.38), and obesity (RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.31-1.79) were risk factors for uncontrolled BP.

CONCLUSION: Older age, lower socioeconomic status, and lower levels of education were associated with decreased access to and willingness to participate in a Web-based intervention to improve hypertension control. Failure to ameliorate this may worsen health care disparities.

PMID: 21371993

Age,Population Markers,Resource Use,High Risk,United States,Adult,African Americans,Age Factors,Educational Status,Electronic Health Records,Electronic Mail,Gender,Hypertension/ethnology,Hypertension/etiology,Linear Models,Middle Aged,Obesity/complications,Poisson Distribution,Risk,Sex Factors,Social Class

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