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Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among persons with an intellectual disability,

Published: January 1, 2010
Category: Reports
Author: Balogh RS
Country: Canada
Language: null
Type: Population Health
Setting: Academic

Manitoba, 1999-2003. Toronto, ON, Canada: University of Toronto (doctoral dissertation).

University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

This thesis examines hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among persons with an intellectual disability living in Manitoba from 1999 to 2003. Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions are considered an indicator of access to, and the quality of, primary care. Intellectual disability can be defined as a disability originating before age 18 characterized by significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behaviour as expressed in conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills. Between 1 and 3% of the population has an intellectual disability. This thesis addressed three objectives: 1) To identify ambulatory care sensitive conditions that are applicable to persons with an intellectual disability; 2) To compare hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive conditions between persons with and without an intellectual disability in Manitoba; 3) To identify factors associated with hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among adults with an intellectual disability living in Manitoba. An online survey of primary care providers with experience working with persons with an intellectual disability found consensus on fifteen ambulatory care sensitive conditions applicable to persons with an intellectual disability. Large discrepancies in hospitalization rates for these conditions were found between persons with and without an intellectual disability. Controlling for age, year, sex, and region, persons with an intellectual disability were 6 times more likely to be hospitalized for an ambulatory care sensitive condition. Future research should investigate reasons for the large discrepancy in rates between persons with and without an intellectual disability. Among adults with an intellectual disability, living in a rural area (odds ratio 1.3; 95% CI=1.0, 1.8), living in an area with a high proportion of First Nations people (odds ratio 2.3; 95% CI=1.3, 4.1), and experiencing higher levels of comorbidity (odds ratio 25.2; 95% CI=11.9, 53.0) were all associated with a higher likelihood of being hospitalized for an ambulatory care sensitive condition. Dwelling in higher income areas had a protective effect (odds ratio 0.56; CI=0.37, 0.85). The results suggest that addressing the socioeconomic problems of poorer areas and specifically areas densely populated by First Nations people would likely have an impact on hospitalizations for ACS conditions for persons with an intellectual disability.

High-Impact Chronic Conditions,Population Markers,Co-morbidity,Canada

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