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papers

Co-morbidity and health care utilisation five years prior to diagnosis for depression

Published: July 12, 2011
Category: Papers
Authors: Andersson D, Borgquist L, Carstensen J, Magnusson H
Country: Sweden
Language: null
Type: Population Health
Setting: Academic

A register-based study in a Swedish population. BMC Public Health 11:552.

Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Family Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden

BACKGROUND: Depressive disorders have been associated with a number of co-morbidities, and we hypothesized that patients with a depression diagnosis would be heavy users of health care services, not only when first evaluated for depression, but also for preceding years. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased health care utilisation and co-morbidity could be seen during five years prior to an initial diagnosis of depression.

METHODS: We used a longitudinal register-based study design. The setting comprised the general population in the county of Östergötland, south-east Sweden. All 2470 patients who were 20 years or older in 2006 and who received a new diagnosis of depression (F32 according to ICD-10) in 2006, were selected and followed back to the year 2001, five years before their depression diagnosis. A control group was randomly selected among those who were aged 20 years or over in 2006 and who had received no depression diagnosis during the period 2001-2006.

RESULTS: Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status. Patients who received a diagnosis of depression used twice the amount of health care (e.g. physician visits and hospital days) during the five year period prior to diagnosis compared to the control group. A particularly strong increase in health care utilisation was seen the last year before diagnosis. These findings were supported with a high level of co-morbidity as for example musculoskeletal disorders during the whole five-year period for patients with a depression diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS: Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status. To find early signs of depression in the clinical setting and to use a preventive strategy to handle these patients is important.

PMID: 21749713
PMCID: PMC3144006

Resource Utilization,Practice Patterns Comparison,Population Markers,Adult,Aged,80 and over,Depression/epidemiology,Gender,Middle Aged,Registries,Social Class,Sweden/epidemiology,Young Adult

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